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Donyale Luna- The True First Black Face of Vogue

Donyale Luna

Well before the wave of supermodels like Cindy and Claudia in the 1990s, Donyale Luna made her mark on the history of fashion with her extraordinary career. Born in Detroit, she had a difficult childhood and an unusual appearance. She was spotted by photographer David McCay and became a superstar of the Seventies. Donyale truly…

Meet the HCIC (Head Chic In Charge) at ABC!

HCIC

There’s a new HCIC (Head Chic In Charge)!  ABC names Channing Dungey as the first African American President.  Dungey, who previously served as the Executive Vice President of Drama at the network has become the first African American to head a major television network. Originally from Sacramento, 46-year old Dungey worked her way up from…

20 Years Ago: Waiting To Exhale Gives Us Life

It was an unlikely hit — a comedy-drama about four African American female friends dealing with issues of romance, careers and fulfillment. But when “Waiting to Exhale” opened two decades ago this holiday season, the movie not only became a breakout success but also touched a cultural nerve with an underserved audience. “‘Waiting to Exhale’…

Rebecca Stiles Taylor

In the early 20th century, women weren’t supposed to be loud or assertive. That was even more true for women of color – but that didn’t stop Savannah teacher, writer, and organizer Rebecca Stiles Taylor. Here’s her story, as we focus on Forgotten Women in Savannah history. It’s tough to assign a label or title…

Ophelia DeVore

Long before the phrase “Black is beautiful” gained currency in the 1960s, Mrs. DeVore-Mitchell was preaching that ethos by example. In New York in the 1940s — an age when modeling schools, and modeling jobs, were overwhelmingly closed to blacks — she helped start the Grace del Marco Modeling Agency and later founded the Ophelia…

Michele Roberts

courtesy of Bio Michele Roberts rose from a childhood in a Bronx public-housing development to attend the UC Berkeley School of Law. She began her legal career as a public defender, eventually becoming a litigation partner for several top firms. In 2014, Roberts became the first female union leader in major North American professional sports…

Assata Shakur

It is important that we know our history told from our people.  In the coming months you will hear about Assata Shakur.  The media has already begun bringing up her name now that the US and Cuba’s relations have become friendly.  They have painted her as a criminal, a felon, a radical, a terrorist.  When…

Henrietta Lacks: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

On January 29, 1951, Lacks went to Johns Hopkins Hospital because she felt a “knot” inside of her. She had told her cousins about the “knot”; they assumed correctly that she was pregnant. But after giving birth to her fifth child, Joseph, Henrietta started bleeding abnormally and profusely. Her local doctor tested her for syphilis,…

Loretta Lynch

It is beyond important for us to recognize those from our past as well as those that are making marks today to be named in future history.  Let us continue to teach our young girls of the greatness they have come from, have become, and can be. Born on May 21, 1959, in Greensboro, North…

Septima Clark

Known as the “Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement,” Septima Poinsette Clark was an educator and civil rights activist who played a major role in the voting rights of African-Americans. In 1920, while serving as an educator in Charleston, Clark worked with the NAACP to gather petitions allowing blacks to serve as principals in Charleston schools….

Female Black Activist-Daisy Bates

Daisy Bates was born on November 11, 1914, in Huttig, Arkansas. She married journalist Christopher Bates and they operated a weekly African-American newspaper, the Arkansas State Press. Bates became president of the Arkansas chapter of the NAACP and played a crucial role in the fight against segregation.  In 1952, she headed the Arkansas branch of…

Who is Mary McLeod Bethune?

Mary McLeod Bethune was a racial justice activist who sought to improve educational opportunities for African-Americans. She is best known for starting a school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida, that eventually became Bethune-Cookman University. She also served as both president of the National Association of Colored Women and founder of the National Council…

What Did Ella Baker Do For Us Black People?

Ella Baker

Ella Baker began her involvement with the NAACP in 1940. She worked as a field secretary and then served as director of branches from 1943 until 1946. In 1957, Baker moved to Atlanta to help organize Martin Luther King’s new organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC). She also ran a voter registration campaign called…

Black Activist Amelia Boynton’s Story

Amelia Boynton was born on August 18, 1911, in Savannah, Georgia. Her early activism included holding black voter registration drives in Selma, Alabama, from the 1930s through the ’50s. In 1964, she became both the first African-American woman and the first female Democratic candidate to run for a seat in Congress from Alabama. That same…

The Story of Female Black Activist Mildred Loving

Mildred Loving was a Civil Rights activist in the 1960s. She and her husband successfully defeated Virginia’s ban on interracial marriage. Mildred Delores Jeter was born on July 22, 1939, in Central Point, Virginia. The shy, somewhat soft-spoken woman became a reluctant activist in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s when she and her…

Do The Right Thing Celebrates 25 Years

Today, we celebrate 25 years since filmmaker, Spike Lee, released the iconic urban classic, “Do The Right Thing”. This is one my top 5 favorite movies EVER!!! When Spike throws the trash can in the window!!!! LOL, my favorite part of all time, “Radioooooooo!!!” What’s yours?

Claudette Colvin

Claudette Colvin (born September 5, 1939) is a pioneer of the African-American civil rights movement. In 1955, she was the first person arrested for resisting bus segregation in Montgomery, Alabama, preceding the better known Rosa Parks incident by nine months. She was among the five women originally included in the federal court case, filed on…

Bunnatine “Bunny” Greenhouse

Bunnatine (Bunny) H. Greenhouse is a former chief contracting officer Senior Executive Service (Principal Assistant Responsible for Contracting (PARC)) of the United States Army Corps of Engineers. On June 27, 2005, she testified to a Congressional panel, alleging specific instances of waste, fraud, and other abuses and irregularities by Halliburton with regard to its operations…

Barbara Rose Johns

In 1951, a 16 year old black high school girl in Prince Edward County, Virginia, led her classmates in a strike to protest the substandard conditions at Robert Russa Moton High School. Enlisting NAACP lawyers Spotswood Robinson and Oliver Hill to her cause, the lawyers filed suit at the federal courthouse in Richmond, Virginia demanding…

Alice Walker

Born in Putnam, GA, Alice Walker is best known as the writer of the critically acclaimed novel, “The Color Purple”.  Her writings have become a part of American History. Walker’s first book of poetry was written while she was a senior at Sarah Lawrence. She took a brief sabbatical from writing while working in Mississippi…

Maggie Lena Walker

Maggie Lena Walker was born on July 15, 1864, in Richmond, Virginia. She attended the Lancester School and later Richmond Colored Normal School. Both of the schools she attended were revolved around the education and advancement of African Americans. She graduated in 1883, and had finished her training as a schoolteacher. Maggie married Armstead Walker…

Daisy Bates

Daisy Bates was born on November 11, 1914, in Huttig, Arkansas. She married journalist Christopher Bates and they operated a weekly African-American newspaper, the Arkansas State Press. Bates became president of the Arkansas chapter of the NAACP and played a crucial role in the fight against segregation, which she documented in her book The Long…

Nannie Helen Burroughs

Nannie Helen Burroughs Nannie Helen Burroughs was born in Orange, Virginia in 1883 to parents John and Jennie Burroughs.  Young Burroughs attended school in Washington, D.C. and then moved to Kentucky where she attended Eckstein-Norton University and eventually received an honorary M.A. degree in 1907. Despite the absence of a college degree, Burroughs sought a…

Bessie Coleman

Bessie Coleman Bessie Coleman was the first black woman to earn a pilot’s license. Because flying schools in the United States denied her entry, she taught herself French and moved to France, earning her license from France’s well-known Caudron Brother’s School of Aviation in just seven months. Coleman specialized in stunt flying and parachuting, earning…

Patricia E. Bath

Patricia E. Bath is the first African American female doctor to patent a medical invention. Patricia Bath’s patent was for a method for removing cataract lenses that transformed eye surgery by using a laser device making the procedure more accurate.  Patricia Bath’s passionate dedication to the treatment and prevention of blindness led her to develop…

Ruby Bridges

Ruby Bridges In spring of 1960, Ruby Bridges was one of 6 black children in New Orleans to pass the test that determined whether or not the black children would go to the all-white school. Ruby was the only one assigned to William Frantz. Her father was initially reluctant, but her mother felt strongly that…

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